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MOS 18 Duty Descriptions

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MOS 18, Special Forces Awards


MOS 18B/Special Forces Weapons Sergeant

STAFF SERGEANT ROBERT A. PAULSON, WHILE ASSIGNED TO 1ST SPECIAL FORCES GROUP, UNITED STATES ARMY, DISTINGUISHED HIMSELF BY EXCEPTIONALLY MERITORIOUS SERVICE IN A COMBAT ZONE WHILE ASSIGNED AS A WEAPONS SERGEANT. DURING THIS PERIOD, STAFF SERGEANT PAULSON'S OUTSTANDING PROFESSIONAL SKILL, KNOWLEDGE, AND LEADERSHIP AIDED IMMEASURABLY IN THE TIMELY LOCATION AND CONFISCATION OF CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE. HE ANALYZED THE LOCAL TERRAIN, REQUIREMENTS, AND LIMITED LOGISTICS SUPPORT, AND DEVELOPED AN OPERATIONS PLAN THAT ENSURED THE SAFE RETURN OF HIS TEAM MATES. THE DISTINCTIVE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF STAFF SERGEANT PAULSON REFLECT GREAT CREDIT UPON HIMSELF, UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP, THE UNITED STATES ARMY AND THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE.



MOS 18C/Special Forces Engineer

Outstanding achievement as an equipment operator from XXXXXXX to XXXXXXXX. Specialist Logan's diligence, hard work and commitment to his Platoon while performing as an equipment operator successfully completed equipment operations on the Special Forces Wounded Warrior Obstacle Course. Specialist Logan mixed, distributed, and placed over 38,000 pounds of concrete and utilized his skills as a senior equipment operator to train and supervise other soldiers on the project. With his keen skills and knowledge, he supervised the completion of 3 drainage ditches and the standing up of 5 significant obstacles. Specialist Logan's dedicated service made a significant contribution to the future of combat operations and reflects credit upon himself, 264th Engineer Clearance Company, 27th Engineer Battalion and the United States Army.



MOS 18D/Special Forces Medical Sergeant

During this period, the professional skill, leadership, and ceaseless efforts of Staff Sergeant Javier contributed to the effectiveness and success of outstation mission (classified) SOFLE KSA. Performing duties as camp medic, SSG Javier was responsible for the health and welfare of 14 U.S. military and civilian personnel as well as more than 45 host nation military officials in an extremely austere and remote location. SSG Javier's extreme professionalism and commitment to duty is a testament to his character and exemplifies the epitome of the Army Values and reflects credit upon himself, 1st Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne) and the United States Army.


For service while assigned as a Medic with Special Operations Aviation Training Battalion-Green Platoon, 160TH Special Operations Aviation Regiment(Airborne). Providing medical training and care to the soldiers assigned to the training battalion, Corporal Hindt's extraordinary efforts and accomplishments during this time provided qualified Night Stalkers for future operations worldwide. His actions reflect great credit upon himself, the 160TH Special Operations Aviation Regiment(Airborne) and the United States Army.


Oustanding achievement as Special Operations medic supporting the Ridge Runner Exercise from XXXXXXXXXX to XXXXXXXX. During this period, Specialist Thomas A. Andersen distinguished himself by developing and implementing a PACE communications plan and coordinating civilian and military air medical assets in a compressed time frame. His focused efforts led to a far safer infil and proper medical coverage of high risk events. Specialist Andersen's dedicated actions and loyal devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself, E Company, 2/19 Forward Support Company and the United States Army.


Sergeant First Class Michael C. Tyler gallantly distinguished himself through exceptionally valorous conduct in the face of the enemy of Afghanistan as the Senior Medical Sergeant for Operational Detachment Alpha 3336 (ODA-3336) with Special Operations Task Force - East with combined Joint Special Operations Task Force - Afghanistan in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. On 4 May 2011, while combat advising the 3d Company, 6th Command Kandak, Sergeant First Class Tyler played a vital role in mission accomplishment due to his professionalism, technical and tactical proficiency and unsurpassed courage. The Commandos and ODA 3336 conducted disruption operations in Hendor Village, Mehtar Lam District, Laghman Province, Afghanistan. Their mission set conditions for Coalition Forces to clear enemy safe havens in adjacent valleys. The insurgents had complete freedom of movement from which they planned and coordinated attacks against the Afghan National Security Forces and Coalition Forces throughout the region. At 0330 hours, the 3d Company, 6th Command Kandak and ODA 3336 conducted an air assault onto Objective MUDSLIDE in Hendor Village to clear a series of compounds suspected of housing insurgent leaders. Upon infiltration, the HA-64 Air Weapons Team (AWT) and AC-130 gunship identified five armed personnel assembling at the southern end of the village. Simultaneously, AWT identified 40 enemy personnel south of the village, maneuvering on friendly forces. The aircraft monitored insurgents emplacing several improvised explosive devices and establishing multiple firing positions. The aircraft monitored insurgents emplacing several improvised explosive devices and establishing multiple fighting positions. Knowing the enemy's preparations, the assault force made the decision to continue forward, close the distance with the enemy, and push on with the mission. Sergeant First Class Tyler continued forward with Supporting Effort 1, fully knowing that the enemies of Afghanistan lay in wait somewhere up ahead. As Sergeant First Class Tyler and SE1 made entry into a compound on the eastern trace of the village, they began receiving a high volume of enemy fire. Insurgents outnumbered the assault force by two-to-one and owned the surrounding high ground, which was littered with concealed caves, spider holes and defensive fighting positions. Their concealed positions provided unobstructed 360 degree fields of fire, enabling them to accurately and heavily engage the assault force for over 10 hours with machinegun and sniper fire. During the fighting, enemy heavy machinegun fire kept the main effort pinned down, as all elements were under accurate volleys of enemy fire from 350 degrees. After several hours of fighting, a Commando moving across an open area received a gunshot wound to the right shoulder. Sergeant First Class Tyler moved to the exposed area with no regard for his personal safety to reach the Commando. Despite being under heavy machinegun fire, Sergeant First Class Tyler maintained a calm state of mind and performed a thorough medical assessment. As Sergeant First Class Tyler brought the bleeding under control, his position came under another barrage of heavy PKM machinegun fire, striking Sergeant First Class Tyler twice with rounds lodging in his aid bag and throwing him against a compound wall. Unfazed and in complete control, Sergeant First Class Tyler maintained his situational awareness and took the initiative, instructing his element to move into a nearby compound and establish a Casualty Collection Point (CCP). Sergeant First Class Tyler moved the casualty to the CCP and then immediately returned to the enemy kill zone, still under accurate machinegun fire, where another Commando was in critical condition after being shot in the face. Sergeant First Class Tyler, without hesitation, made his way to the Commando in the direct line of enemy fire, controlled the excessive bleeding coming from the Commando's face before safely moving him to the CCP. Constantly engaged by enemy fire, Sergeant First Class Tyler continued treating the casualties in a controlled manner, instilling confidence in the rest of his element to continue with the fight. After preparing the two casualties for movement to the initial Helicopter Landing Zone for Medical Evacuation, Sergeant First Class Tyler continued critical medical treatment, all the while moving under a heavy barrage of enemy fire. The litter team carrying the casualty was consumed by relentless, accurate, heavy machinegun fire, causing them to abandon the casualty and take cover. Sergeant First Class Tyler placed himself in front of the ambulatory casualty to protect him from incoming fire and safely moved him out of the area. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Sergeant First Class Tyler radioed to the junior medic that he was on his way back to retrieve the litter casualty. After assembling some Commandos and leading the charge back down the alleyway, Sergeant First Class Tyler reached the pinned down element only to find the Commandos had taken cover behind a wall. Sergeant First Class Tyler kept moving under heavy machinegun and sniper fire and made it to the casualty. Continuing to move through the kill zone and over remnants of dilapidated stone structures, Sergeant First Class Tyler was forced to take cover due to the devastating fire of enemy machineguns that cut him off from the rest of the aid and litter team. After 30 minutes of being cut off alone and with unwavering enemy fire pinning him down, the detachment senior engineer initiated a large controlled detonation in Sergeant First Class Tyler's general vicinity. The explosion resulted in a large dust cloud, which gave Sergeant First Class Tyler a small window of opportunity to use as concealment to reconnoiter a route back to the CCP. Sergeant First Class Tyler led the way for the aid and litter team across open terrain for more than 50 meters. Upon leaving the concealment of the dust cloud, enemy fighters commenced another attack on the aid and litter team. Still separated from the main force, Sergeant First Class Tyler traversed numerous danger areas, all the while covering the casualty through the open areas. Sergeant First Class Tyler took up a position to cover the medical evacuation on the ground and maintained a constant rate of fire until the aircraft made a safe exit. Sergeant First Class Tyler linked up with his element, and continued to engage the enemy until exfiltration was complete. Sergeant First Class Tyler's selfless actions under extreme duress saved the lives of several United States Special Forces Soldiers and Afghanistan Commandos. His gallantry and perseverance under extreme circumstances played a vital role in the destruction of three enemy fighting positions, the killing of one Taliban commander and three Taliban sub-commanders strong-pointed in reinforced defensive positions. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force- Afghanistan, the Combined Forces Special Operations Component Command-Afghanistan and the United States Army.



MOS 18E/Special Forces Communications Sergeant

FOR EXCEPTIONALLY VALOROUS ACTION IN THE FACE OF OVERWHELMING ODDS AND DIRECT HOSTILE AGGRESSION AS THE COMMUNICATIONS SERGEANT FOR AN ADVANCED TEAM CONDUCTING COMBINED COMBAT OPERATIONS IN AFGHANISTAN. STAFF SERGEANT MILLER'S EXCEPTIONAL COURAGE, DEDICATION TO MISSION, AND PERSONAL SACRIFICE DIRECTLY CONTRIBUTED TO THE SUCCESSFULL EVACUATION AND TREATMENT OF 14 AMERICANS AND 28 NORTHERN ALLIANCE SOLDIERS. HIS REMARKABLE PERFORMANCE AND SELFLESS COMMITMENT TO HIS FELLOW COMRADES-IN-ARMS ENHANCED CRITICAL OPERATIONS AND SIMULTANEOUSLY PREVENTED THE LOSS OF LIFE. STAFF SERGEANT MILLER'S ACTIONS WHILE ENGAGED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS DURING OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM REFLECT GREAT CREDIT UPON HIM, THE 5TH SPECIAL FORCES GROUP (AIRBORNE) AND THE UNITED STATES ARMY.


Communications Manager

Meritorious service as Communications Manager, 5th Special Forces Group from XXXXXXXX to XXXXXXXXX. During this period, Master Sergeant Charles D. Walker directed unit civilian and active duty personnel as team leader during wartime deployment greatly improving contingency knowledge. Surpassing all expectations, Sergeant Walker's hands-on leadership was the catalyst for the entire effort. He coordinated and supported 5th Special Forces Group wartime communication plans, training, planning, and resolved communications problems that threatened the unit mission ensuring 100% reliable communications. Sergeant Walker's efforts were directly responsible for attaining 100% operational status in less than 6 months. Master Sergeant Walker's leadership and loyal devotion to duty during this period reflect credit upon himself, 5th Special Forces Group and the United States Army.



MOS 18F/Special Forces Operations and Intel Sergeant

Meritorious service as Fire Support Officer, 1-19th Special Forces Group (Airborne). As the senior fire support representative in the SOTF Tactical Operations Center, Master Sergeant Chambers effectively battle tracked, controlled, and managed fire support assets required for SOTF operations. Maintaining constant situational awareness, he repeatedly relayed time sensitive information, made possible by his meticulous preparation, to ensure the Commander had consistent, relevant, and actionable information available immediately upon request. His untiring work ethic and devotion directly impacted the success of JCS exercise Cobra Gold. Master Sergeant Chambers' extraordinary efforts and accomplishments during this period reflect credit upon himself, 1-19th Special Forces Group (Airborne) and the United States Army.



MOS 18Z/Special Forces Senior Sergeant

FOR OUTSTANDING SERVICE AS A PROJECT ENGINEER IN THE ISRAEL AREA OFFICE, EUROPE DISTRICT, US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (USACE). MASTER SERGEANT LEMMON QUICKLY MASTERED USACE PROCEDURES AND FLAWLESSLY MANAGED MULTIPLE DUTIES AS A PROJECT ENGINEER, QUALITY ASSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE, AND OFFICE ENGINEER IN SUPPORT OF THE ISRAEL AREA OFFICE. MASTER SERGEANT LEMMON'S EFFORTS EPITOMIZE THE CORPS' TRADITION OF ARMY EXCELLENCE AND HIS ACCOMPLISHMENTS REFLECT GREAT CREDIT UPON HIM, THE US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS AND THE UNITED STATES ARMY.










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